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? >> i think if the republican party would have listened to what steve said in his opening comments they would begin to rehabilitate themselves quickly. i think there is going to be a civil war between, you know, the view of people like steve and the view of some in the entertainment complex and the hard right. i really thought up here, i'm not going to say a single challenging thing about governor romney. but it was reported that he thanked some of his donors, the nice thing to do. he said ha the reason he lost was that the president had given gifts, his word "gifts" to young people in the form of student lones and student lone repayment policy. gifts to the latino community by saying if dream act kids would not be deported over the next couple of years. so that sends a fundamental misreading about what happened. paul ryan said yesterday, the reason we won is we did well in urban areas. ok. we won wisconsin. we won jamesville his hometown by 4 points and he lost it by 10. it's not an urban area. so it's disturbing within eight days that there's still this thing about that gift, gif
and the entire capitol hill family of staff of the passing of my dear friend and chief of staff steve vermilion. for nearly 25 years i have known steve as a friend, family man and committed public servant. my service in congress has been greatly enhanced by steve's invaluable advice and knowledge regarding all aspects of the legislative process. as a 17-year veteran of capitol hill, steve will be dealer missed by the capitol family for his warmth and his sense of service to this institution and our nation. steve began his service in the house of representatives in 1986, serving as communications director for then congressman bob livingston. he subsequently served as a legislative snippet for congressman james sensenbrenner, as chief of staff to former congressman lincoln diaz-balart, and my chief of staff. an avid and champion rover who, steve was recognized for his work throughout his years in congress with such distinction as the congressional staff leadership award and the congress allege hispanic leadership institute. steve demonstrated his commitment to service with great dignity these pas
about five races that we were watching very carefully. my first time was spent working with steve israel to make sure we had the resources to prevail in those races. my second time i spent was to call people who were not successful in this particular election. everybody here was getting a lot of calls -- a running is very noisy. not succeeding, the phones do not ring that much. so i wanted to hear from them, what their views were about how we go forward. then to take the calls of my colleagues to see what their view is. what i talked about here, about changing the role of money in politics, is really very important motivator for me to stay in the leader's office. i think it must be done. when people say money did not make any difference in the campaign, they all wasted their money -- that really was not true. the president of the united states, the most well known, respected person on the planet, had to spend about $1 billion to set the record straight from what that big money was putting out there. senate races, house races, tammy duckworth had $7 million spent against her of outside mo
. they could not celebrate this success without the leadership of steve israel, the chair. when i asked him to take this responsibility to serve our country and colleagues, i i said to all of you that he is a gold standard of a member of congress. he knows the policy. he cares about american people. that drives him to do the politics to increase our numbers to pass legislation that takes us for to improve the lives of americans. before i bring him on, i wanted to have a representative of the freshman class to speak on behalf of the class. i am very honored to welcome a fighter for the middle class, a real representative of his generation, congressman alec patrick murphy. his election is a cuase for celebration. his election sends the message to a new generation of americans that their voices will be heard at the table. congratulations, congressman a -elect, patch of mercy. -- patrick murphy. >> thank you for your leadership and for being here with us. thank you for your support. my name is patrick murphy from florida district 18. the youngest member of congress. i did defeatists someone you
in this country, we are sorting out the mess she left behind. >> steve cry. >> thank you very much, speaker, moving on as we must i would echo the comments on the u.s. election and congratulate mr. obama on his victory. it's good to see a leader re-elected in difficult times. would the deputy prime minister indulge me, alongside emerging markets in the middle east britain should look to strengthen economic and trade ties to the u.s. with a new trade deal as we seek to boost our recovery and maybe start one across the channels? >> i agree with you and i think the lesson of the presidential elections in the states is the voters' memories are longer than members seem to think because voters when it comes to casting a vote remember who created the mess in the first place and who has to do the painstaking and difficult, yes, longer than we hoped job of sorting out the mess. and of course there is so much we need to do to work together with the new obama administration and he talks about trade. i'd like to see a new e.u.-u.s. free trade agreement which would spur economic growth in both our econo
line. >> good morning. steve, we've got so many groups and caucus they're all saying now you have your it's time for me to have mine. once that group gets what they want the next group says, well the first two got what they want and this is what we want. this, i don't see this ending. it's very sad situation and unfortunately i don't see much of a future as long as we have all these groups and caucuses. can i give you constructive criticism. i've been watching c-span now for decades and especially "washington journal". if i don't see it live i'll watch the tape. the new gentlemen you had on twice last week as a moderator on friday and before spends too much time reading newspaper. i'm not saying that some of the articles aren't pertinent but much too much time is spent when he's reading the newspaper and people are not able to get through. >> ed thanks for watching and being a loyal viewer and listener. of course you can check out this program anytime at journal@cspan.org there's a perspective as the chart saying yep the federal government is stillen ensure wensurer. accounting for nea
. he finally got it at that point he said i'm terribly sorry my name is steve if you want to report me and he ran for the door. i felt bad for steve. i like steve. i chased after him to make sure he knew no hard feelings. so every time i see him in the hall i say high so he knows there are no hard feelings. although it did occur to me, his name is probably not steve. \[laughter] so when i started this year, 2010 i was looking forward to two things, two steps that i believed would help us fundamentally transform our government into that kind of government or something more closely representing or resembling that kind of government that our founding father's envisioned for us. one of those events i knew would occur in june, probable toward the end of june probable the last thursday in june chi quickly identified as june 28. the other date that i recognize as potentially transformative of our government, the other date that i recognize that i thought would probably have a positive impact on the development of our constitutional system of government was november 6. and i would just like to
-treatment. one of the doctors quoted was dr. steve nissan, the head of cardiology at the cleveland clinic. so we gave him a call and asked him to be in our film. he agreed. it is through him we started to learn more about the cleveland clinic as a model for health care. and in speaking with them, we met dr. cho and yyvonne osborne was one of dr. cho's patients. >> here's more of that story. >> i have lost since last year 21 pounds. >> oh, my gosh. she had bypass surgery at an early age, 27 cardiac catheterizations and well over seven s. tents. thds an unbelievable amount of students -- stents and cardiac caths. i can't tell you how shocked we were when we saw her for the first time. here is a young lady whose diabetes was never well controlled, her cholesterol was never controlled. if someone had talked to her, i think many of her cardio catheterizations and stents would not have bb necessary. >> that is an extreme case, but so many people have stents that don't need them. in fact, 97% of stents aren't helpful or useful. >> why do they do it? >> because that's what they are taught to do. it is
to immigration. >> i was an immigration lawyer for 15 years, and as a conservative voice, understand what steve is saying, but i think we have to realize as the republican party that we're never going to be a majority party if we do not figure out a way to reach the hispanic community. so we have to find what i call -- and i have talked about this for two years -- a conservative consensus on emigration. we have to figure out how steve and i will sit and agree on a bill and people at this table that will actually do something about our broken immigration system. one of the biggest things that conservatives talk about often is that we want to fix a broken government. if you know anything about immigration law, this system is absolutely broken in the united states. we need to figure out a way where people can come to the united states through a legal system, border protection, all those things that we have to do, but at the same time we have to figure out what we can -- which cannot keep putting the ball for the next congress to fix this issue. so i try to get the conservatives here in the house t
's watch steve bird. >> one company has figured out how to lower health care costs by more than 40%. >> it's an idea that's received national attention. >> following the example of places like safeway. >> the safeway super market chain looked for a way to rein in spiraling premiums and hit on what seems to be a win-win solution. >> in 2005, we had a $1 billion health care bill rising at the rate of $100 million per year. >> these are the cost of all of our drugs in order. so diabetics. you can see how many. >> what we discovered was that 70% of health care costs were drive bin people's bavers. >> i was over 200 pounds. i had my pizza, my comics, dvds and that was my weekend. >> you realize one day, i haven't worked out, i haven't exercised and you get busy and it's the last thing that you're really concerned about. >> i was chronically coming down with colds and i knew that there was a history of cancer in my family, diabetes. heart disease. i was a walking dead man. >> i was a business guy. i thought if we could influence behavior of our 200,000 person workforce we could have a material e
to ask steve about the natural gas developments for passenger cars. i wanted to see what he thought about the prices for those. i think they are in the low $2 per gallon range. and see what the holdup is with this industry, why it hasn't taken off quicker? guest: i think the reason is because it is expensive to build a natural gas fired car. it is hard to refuel it. you cannot pull up your local gasoline station where you do now for gasoline or diesel. i think the first advances we will see a natural gas-fired vehicles will probably be in fleet vehicles. they tend to come back to the same location. you do not have to change the entire infrastructure of nearly 100,000 gasoline stations. host: anything else? steve, florida, a democrat. caller: good morning. i would like to ask a question if he could explain it to a lot of my friends. for some reason, they think because we're going to outpace saudi arabia, can you please explain to these people in oil production that if it is $150 a barrel in the united states, it is $150 in beijing, china. they all think it is our oil because it is coming o
, as will the head of the d triple c, chairman johns for the house races, steve israel of new york, news conference coming at 2:00 eastern. we'll likely have it for you here on c-span as the house is expected to gavel out quickly at 2:00. >> what i like about c-span's coverage is it's in-depth. oftentimes you'll cover an event from start to finish, and i can get the information that i need. i like to watch the communicators, i like to watch congressional hearings. the events that you do at the national press club where there are policy leaders speaking. i find those useful. >> howard woolley watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. the lame duck session starts at 2:00 p.m. eastern. until then part of this morning's "washington journal." host: we are back with the former senator from indiana served as democrat for that state from 1999 to 2011. now co-founder of the no labels organization. senator bayh, let me begin with the petraeus resignation. what's your reaction? you served on the intelligence
arkansas and the state commander mary irvin is here. thank you for being here. and steve do we appreciate you also much and all you do to work so hard for veterans and the state of arkansas. certainly this is a very critical time for our nation's veterans and it is so important that the legion, so important you are here. don't ever underestimate how important it is here. telling your congressman and senators, your staffs, which is sometimes even more important, telling the stance how important things are as we move forward. i know all americans are very concerned about employment security but veterans in particular are struggling with a meaningful employment in careers. this is certainly a very difficult economy. you mentioned, commander, the vow to hire heroes act and veterans jobs at -- certainly these are steps in the right direction. again, everyone deserves credit in a very bipartisan way in moving forward. but there are still a number of things we can do and will do in that area. on the other hand, we have to be careful. certainly we want to do these efforts. we cannot do those by m
, working with steve israel to make sure we had the intellectual, financial, whatever resources to prevail in those races. my second time that i spent was to call people who were not successful in this particular election, because everybody here was getting a lot of calls. winning is very noisy. not succeeding is -- the bells don't ring that much. so i wanted to hear from them, what their views were about how we go forward. and then to absorb the calls of my colleagues to see what their view is. but i -- what i talked about here about changing the role of money and politics is really a very important motivator for me to stay in the leader's office. i think it must be done. when people say that, oh, and i read in the course of this week, money didn't make any difference in the campaign. they alwasted their money. well, that really wasn't true. the president of the united states, the most well-known famous respected person on the planet had to spend about $1 billion to set the record straight from what that other big money was putting out there. senate races, house races. tammy douglas had $
are turning to steve sloan. tell us about the time line this week. caller: the president begins with a series of meetings with corporate leaders over the next few days to reestablish his relationship with the business community after his election. it all culminates on friday with a meeting with congressional leaders to discuss how to move forward on the fiscal cliff. host: what has each side said moving into the negotiations? i know that there was a white house address west we from president obama. caller: the president continued to push for revenue of, saying it was vital to be part of a balanced solution. notably, he said nothing about raising tax rates. many people are taking this to assume that he is open to that revenue by closing loopholes as opposed to raising tax rates. on capitol hill, most republican leaders, including john boehner, have shifted in recent days, and they are talking more about their openness, much more so than they were before the election. they are saying that they are open to revenue, but only in the formal closing loopholes, not raising rates. host: the front page
the chairman of the space subcommittee, steve palazzo, for bringing this must-pass legislation to the floor today. i also want to thank my friend and colleague from texas, ralph hall, the chairman of the science committee, and the professional staff of the committee for shepherding this bill and getting us to the point where we are now. last june the space and aeronautics subcommittee heard testimony on why government indemnification for commercial rocket launchers must be extended. at that hearing the aerospace industry association said it best about why this indemnification is needed. quote, many foreign launch providers competing against u.s. companies are already benefiting from indemnification rules. for example, the european company is required to purchase insurance up to $60 million euros, roughly $75 million. any damages above this cap are the guaranteed responsibility of the french government. we cannot afford to drive away highly skilled technical jobs to foreign countries where the regulatory framework provide better critical risk management tools. lastly, a nonrenewal could impe
. you can call in with your questions to steve latourette, a member of the appropriations committee. rep raul grijalva and jason dick. live at 7:00 a.m. eastern. at going senate budget committee chairman kent conrad sent a final deficit reduction plan would total about $5 trillion. >> red carpet interviews with nonfiction finalists. all online live tomorrow at 6:00 p.m. eastern. add your comments about the evening. >>he said building in medicare eligibility age in changing the formula for social security benefits could be part of the final deal. his remarks and the wall street journal's annual ceo council meeting are about 25 minutes. >> if there has been -- one of the most constructive conversation that has taken place in congress in the last couple of years has been a group of senators called the gang of six. we invited all six but due to various scheduling conflicts, we got one. senator kent conrad. they are negotiating in the back room. i would also point out senator kent conrad has been budget committee chairman and is retiring at the end of this year. senator, great to have you her
of the ryan plan. my overall point is, and unfortunately we have not seen this in the past few years, steve is coming more from the right than from my side, but the overall bank is that both sides are born to half to be willing to take on a significant amount of pain. i hope the willingness is there in order to make the grand bargain as they say. a great show, thank you very much host: thank you. guest: adding the caller makes a great point. for there to be a compromise, with the want to say is they want to see them change the entitlement programs. these are medicare, medicaid, potentially social security, although there's less clamoring to change that. want to see those programs changed so they are not just these open-ended things were the costs go up. went to see them reforms. so that does not keep adding to the deficit and increasing the federal budget. but the democrats want to see more revenue. want to see higher tax rates, they want republicans to agree to that. for this to be this big grand deal, both sides will have to come to an agreement. host: nancy has a recent story with this h
security team. here is what steve tweets -- morris in san diego and joins us now, a republican color. caller: i have no confidence whatsoever in this national security team. i have less confidence a denture the president. i think this whole thing leads right to the white house. write to the oval office. president obama has made some statements already there are so contradictory there is no way he can explain the contradiction of his comments. you talk about a transparent administration -- yes, there are transparent. you can see right through them. there are as corrupt as any i have seen. i think this will lead to impeachment. i think he will be convicted of it as well. host: here is what bill says on twitter. charlie on the independent line. caller: i am not happy with senator mccain. he lost the election. he is still trying to get even for their loss of the election. he is a great supporter of our country attacking iran. how many soldiers and how many people will get killed because of the disaster that would be if we got involved in iran. he should be one of the people doing the new
this morning is about the white house national security team. here's what steve tweets in. i am more confident of this national security team than the one that told me there were w.m.d. in iraq. morris in san diego, california, joins us now. republican caller. hi. caller: good morning. i have no confidence whatsoever in this national security team. in fact i have less confidence in the president. i think this whole thing of benghazi leads right to the white house. right to the oval office. and president obama has made some statements already that are so contradictory of each other there is no way in the world he could explain the contradiction of his comments. talk about a transparent administration. yeah, they are transparent all right of you can see right through them. and they are as corrupt as any i have seen. i think this is going to lead to impeachment. i don't think that's an overstatement. i think it will lead right to impeach. and i think he will be convicted of it. host: it's almost laughable to see is senator mccain comment about susan rice's qualifications after picking sara palin
and for the middle east to finally begin to deliver for its people. >> steve, concluding question, what do you see as the role of the united states in the world today? there is the day amongst foreign-policy experts on american exceptional was and, the decline of the u.s. role, the desire to pull back. you gave advice to the world affairs council before. what is their role? >> the world affairs council, you are a wonderful forum in local communities across this country, bringing people together from all walks of life, having a debate on these issues. the foreign policy debates of our presidential campaigns are, i find, quite vacuous and full of straw man red herrings and do not get to the real issues. well, in your forms, you can get to the real issues and invite politicians to hold their feet to the fire and do not expect these kinds of superficial answers, which we get from campaigns. i have been in washington for a long time, too long, but my wife is a washingtonian, so we are still here, and every 10 years you get this narrative that america is in decline, overstretched, downsize your objectiv
of the elected officials here tonight, including congressman steve king. if you could ostensibly could give you a warm round of applause -- if you could all please stand so we could give you a warm round of applause. [applause] thank you so much for being here to celebrate the birthday of our governor and a dear friend of mine, governor brandstad. thank you for your support over the past two years and for your continued support over the next two years. our administration would not be as successful without you. and the space and the confidence and trust you have placed in us to get the job done. we are going to keep working diligently each and every day to continue to make iowa a great place to live, raise a family, grow and start a business. i would also like to give a special thank you to senator rubio for being with us this evening. i was honored to have the opportunity to serve as his secretary of the republican national convention and that is where i first had the opportunity to meet senator rubio. not only did i have the opportunity to hear him address the nation, but also the governor and
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)